Crown Point Garden Club

Growing in East Hamilton

Category: Pipeline Trail Garden

Walking Tour of Crown Point Public Gardens

In celebration of National Garden Days the Crown Point Garden Club will host a walking tour of the public gardens it maintains. Mark your calendars for the evening of Tuesday June 19. The free, 1.5 km tour starts at 6:30 p.m. sharp. Meet at the trailhead of the Pipeline Trail, behind the Dairy Queen at the corner of Main and Ottawa. Route details are below

All are welcome. Feel free to meet the tour at any point on the route.

The route:
– east on the trail to the Pollinator garden and Triangle Garden.
– left/north at Park Row to the Park Row Boulevard pollinator patches
– possible side trip to Cunningham parkette, site of future garden
– east on Cannon to Kenilworth to the DePave Garden at corner of Britannia and Kenilworth
– social gathering to follow. Manacala? Merk?

Questions? Send us an email via the online form on the contact page:

Pipeline Pollinator Paradise– what we’ve learned

Pipeline Pollinator Garden Aug 8 2017

Pipeline Pollinator Paradise, August 8, 2017.

The Pipeline Trail native plant garden, now in its third season, is in full “yellow daisy” display. It’s turned into a beautiful, lush, and remarkably garden-like feature on the west end of the trail. Here’s what we’ve learned about planting and maintaining a large garden, with volunteer labour, on public land, on terrible hard-packed clay.

  • Mulch mulch and more mulch. Plain old woodchips, at least three inches, will turn the clay into something plants can grow in. We are seeing worms, soil-dwelling insects and micro-fauna, and the beginnings of hyphae networks. Life is emerging, starting with the soil
  • weeding is very important. We stayed on top of the weeds for the first two summers. Now we can be less vigilant–soil disturbance is low so buried seeds don’t germinate.
  • Heliopsis helianthoides / Smooth Oxeye Daisy

    Heliopsis helianthoides / Smooth Oxeye Daisy with ripening berries from Sambucus canadensis / Elderberry shrub

  • Deadhead. Yes we want the birds to enjoy the seeds but we also have to consider that allowing volunteer seedlings creates a huge amount of work for us. The Coreopsis tripteris, wild geranium, and asters have been the most pesky. These plants need special attention
  • Be prepared to treat the space like a “real” garden. Plants will flop over (especially this year with all the rain and rampant growth) so staking and tying is necessary. Move and spread things so the garden looks good from several angles. Make sure species receive the sun they need. Add and rearrange plants so that something is in bloom in every area, all the time.
  • Monarda, Heliopsis, Pycnanthemum, Rosa virginiana

  • People are pigs. Yes, they throw pop bottles, cigarette butts, and all manner of garbage into the garden. We found a tray of cat litter. Also, some donations: hostas and morning glories. Be prepared for the work and always bring trash bags to a weeding session.
  • The wild strawberries (Fragaria virginica) do not play nice. They are easily the most aggressive plant in the garden and they should be given their own space. They completely overran the Carex they were planted with, requiring a rescue mission for the sedge.
  • Take photos and teach volunteers how to distinguish seedlings from weeds.
  • Pipeline Pollinator Garden, from west, Aug. 8, 2017

  • Keep an eye out for species that are struggling. We lost the Pearly Everlastings in the first winter and have not managed to re-establish them. The Liatris cylindracea never got established at all. We lost some native grasses, too.
  • Note which species are doing better than expected. The Penstemon hirsutus is thriving so we introduced Penstemon digitalis.
  • Fill in the bare areas or nature will do it for you.


Species Inventory at Pipeline Trail Pollinator Garden

Pollinator Garden on Pipeline Trail, Aug. 28 2015

Pollinator Garden on Pipeline Trail, Aug. 28 2015

The species list has its own page here: species inventory page
See also the sidebar for link.

Planting Day!

On the sunny cool morning of June 6 2015 a dozen volunteers gathered to plant the pollinator garden on the Pipeline Trail. Over three hours we planted 200 individual plants of 24 different species over approximately 700 square feet of garden. The skill and hard work of the this group were truly remarkable.

The Work Crew, at quitting time.

The Work Crew, at quitting time.

Kelly and Jen, with Matt and Emily

Kelly and Jen, with Matt and Emily

Fran, planting the trailside area

Fran, planting the trailside area

Anne

Anne

Tamara and Elizabeth

Tamara and Elizabeth

Interns and Students-- very helpful indeed

Interns and Students– very helpful indeed